087 | A Frank Discussion About Women in the Church

Welcome to episode 87 of The Grace Cafe Podcast. Sarah Knaub joins Susan in this episode as they talk about the church’s dismissive view of women. This excellent conversation was prompted by John MacArthur’s “go home” statement directed toward Beth Moore. Susan and Sarah’s conversation is loaded with rich and important content. Roles, submission, spiritual gifts, personal preference, teaching, marriage, men, children, strength, and theology are just a few of the topics this episode covers. Push play and join the conversation. Share it with a friend and subscribe in your favorite podcast app or on iHeartRadio.

We interviewed Sarah once before in episode 18 where we talked about the church and mental illness.

-Enjoy!


Photo by John Bussell on Unsplash

086 | Preach The Word?

Welcome to episode 86 of The Grace Cafe Podcast. The phrase “the Word of God” appears several times in the New Testament. I had always heard and believed that “the Word of God’ was a reference to the Bible. I assumed that the Bible is the Word of God and that the phrase “the Word of God” was another way of saying the Bible. When Paul told Timothy to preach the word, it’s assumed he meant preach the Bible. 

But the Bible never calls itself the Word of God. That phrase is reserved in Scripture for Jesus (Rev. 19:13) and the gospel (1 Thessalonians 2:9, 13), as determined by context. Tradition has given the Bible the title, the Word of God, but the Bible itself never does.

That topic is sandwiched in the middle of this episode from our old Known & Loved podcast that originally aired in March of 2017 and was a conversation that took us in several directions. Shout out to our friend Rocky Glenn in this episode who wrote us a letter that we interacted with. We hope this episode encourages you.


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085 | Labels, Assumptions, And Finding The Courage to Question

Welcome to episode 85 of The Grace Cafe Podcast. We’ve had some recent conversations with others who’ve related their stories to us about how asking honest questions resulted in being shunned, shamed, and even asked to leave the group they were in. When our journeys take a turn away from performance and toward a more genuine experience with grace, the resulting freedom that accompanies that experience is scary to those who haven’t discovered it yet and asking questions or expressing new opinions based on your new-found freedom, is a threat to those in charge or those whose journey is all about performance.

Let’s talk about it.


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084 | Take Five: Does Truth Balance Grace?

Welcome to episode 84 of The Grace Cafe Podcast. When John wrote, “For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ” (John 1:17), was he giving us a formula to keep grace in check with truth? Does grace need balanced with truth in order to keep it manageable? Is truth somehow opposed to the free operation of grace? I lost count years ago of the number of times I’ve heard John’s words explained this way.

Let’s talk about it in this edition of Take Five.


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083 | Fear and Doubt

Welcome to episode 83 of The Grace Cafe Podcast. Fear and doubt. These are two emotions we can all relate to and we all experience to varying levels and at different times. In performance-based, top-down religious environments, fear and doubt are common byproducts because the spotlight is on our own failed performance. At the same time, fear and doubt are not allowed to be expressed in that environment because they’re counterproductive to it. In performance-based Christianity, fear and doubt require us to wear masks and pretend we’re something we’re not, increasing our level of fear and doubt. The goal is to clean it up and get back to pretending. 

“And have mercy on those who doubt.” Jude vs. 6

-Enjoy!


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082 | Take Five: Is Taking Up My Cross a Spiritual Discipline?

Welcome to episode 82 of the Grace Cafe Podcast. In this edition of Take Five, Mike talks about taking up our cross and following Jesus. When Jesus said, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me” (Matthew 16:24) was he referring to a spiritual discipline that involves denying my own needs and bearing up under trials? That’s a common interpretation of this passage. We’re told that when trials come, we all “have our cross to bear” and my ability to hold up well under trials becomes the litmus test for revealing how strong or weak my faith is, based on my ability or inability to deny myself and bear my cross.

But is that what Jesus meant? A more intentional look at the context reveals something completely different. This is not a spiritual discipline, but an invitation to believe. Here’s a link to the blog post I quoted from in last week’s edition of Take Five as well as this week’s:

-Enjoy!


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081 | Rooted and Grounded in Grace: A Conversation With Joel Brueseke

Welcome to episode 81 of The Grace Cafe Podcast. Joel Brueseke joins us on this episode as we talk about what it means to be rooted and grounded in grace. Joel is co-host, along with Mike Kapler, of The Growing in Grace podcast and Joel also has a solo podcast and blog called Grace Roots. Our conversation took us into the many things that so easily distract us and lure us away from what it means to be rooted and grounded in grace alone, apart from performance. You can find Joel on line at:

We hope this episode encourages you like it did us.

Enjoy!


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080 | Take Five: Is Dying Daily a Spiritual Discipline?

Welcome to episode 80 of The Grace Cafe Podcast. In this edition of Take Five, let’s talk about what is often referred to as spiritual disciplines. Specifically, the assumed discipline of dying daily. Paul told the Corinthians he died daily. I believe we have incorrectly inserted ourselves into that passage in an attempt to make dying daily a spiritual discipline that we’re to be actively doing. But is that what Paul had in mind? Let’s talk about it.


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